Smartphone market to grow 52% in 2008

The smartphone market is expected to grow 52% in 2008 compared to 2007, to 190 mln units. That’s 15%, or $65 bln-worth, of the total 1.28 bln handsets expected to be sold 2008. In 2012, Gartner expects smartphone unit sales to reach over 700 mln of the total 1.8 bln handset market; that’s 65%, or $200 bln-worth, of the total $312 bln mobile phone market at that time.

Global cell phone market to grow 11% in 2008

Gartner expects cell phone market growth to slow to 11% from 16% in 2007, and in US dollar terms growth would slow to 9% from 11%. Handset vendors sold 304.7 mln mobile phones globally in Q2 2008, with strong demand in emerging markets lifting sales 11.8% from Q2 2007. The main gainer from surging sales in emerging markets was Nokia, whose market share rose to 39.5% in Q2 2008 from 36.7% in Q2 2007.

What Web sites people visit on mobile phones

Brazil Russia India China US Europe
1 Email (57%) Entertainment (34%) Games (38%) Entertainment (55%) Email (65%) Email (46%)
2 Music (27%) Search (29%) Email (33%) Games (36%) Weather (41%) Search (25%)
3 Entertainment (25%) Email (24%) Entertainment (21%) Music (31%) Search (29%) News/Politics (24%)
4 Games (18%) Music (24%) Music (18%) News/Politics (26%) News/Politics (26%) Weather (24%)
5 News/Politics & Movies (tied 12%) Games (24%) Sports (15%) Business/Finance (18%) City Guides/ Maps (24%) Sports (22%)
Source: Nielsen

US cell phone sales down 13% in Q2 2008

28 mln cell phones were sold in the United States in Q2 2008, a decline of 13% from Q2 2007. The total value of the market was down only 2% from Q2 2007, at $2.4 bln, according to NPD. Motorola’s phones were the most popular, but its share of the units sold dropped to 21%, from 32% in 2007.

75.8% of UK iPhone users are males

Country Total Mobile Market Smartphones iPhone
Male Female Male Female Male Female
EU3 50.6% 49.4% 69.4% 30.6% 72.3% 27.7%
France 49.2% 50.8% 70.9% 29.1% 67.3% 32.7%
Germany 53.7% 46.3% 69.9% 30.1% 71.2% 28.8%
UK 48.7% 51.3% 68.2% 31.8% 75.8% 24.2%
Source: comScore

Internet usage habits among smartphone subscribers

Internet Service Accessed via Phone iPhone Smartphone Market
Any news of information via browser 80.4% 32.2% 10.7%
Accessed web search 56.6% 18.3% 5.0%
Watched any mobile TV and/or video 32.0% 14.6% 7.4%
Accessed a social networking site or blog 42.4% 10.3% 3.2%
Listened to music on mobile phone 70.0% 32.5% 18.4%
Used email (work or personal) 69.5% 25.6% 7.6%
Source: comScore

Mobile user activities among 7 countries

US EU FR DE IT ES UK
Total mobile subscribers, mln. 226 224 46.5 49 47 34 47.5
Sent/received photos or videos 23.9% 27.6% 24.7% 20.6% 31.9% 31.1% 30.7%
Listened to music 7.9% 18.5% 16.7% 17.7% 15.6% 22.9% 20.7%
Accessed news/info via browser 14.4% 9.6% 10.3% 5.4% 8.0% 7.4% 16.4%
Received SMS ads 19.1% 49.3% 63.0% 28.5% 54.0% 72.5% 36.2%
Played downloaded game 9.1% 8.4% 4.4% 7.5% 8.9% 11.7% 10.2%
Accessed downloaded application 5.0% 3.0% 1.6% 2.6% 4.2% 2.9% 3.4%
Watched video 6.3% 9.1% 7.2% 6.1% 11.3% 12.6% 9.5%
Purchased ringtones 9.3% 3.6% 3.7% 3.1% 3.7% 4.4% 3.2%
Used email 13.1% 8.6% 6.5% 6.7% 11.5% 9.4% 9.4%
Accessed social networking sites 5.2% 2.9% 2.2% 1.5% 2.8% 2.8% 5.3%

78% of US cell phone purchases are made in store

The overwhelming majority of cell phone buyers make the purchase in a store – some 78% do, with 12% buying online and 9% by some other means. Among the narrower set of those who use the internet in their cell phone research, 26% bought their device online. 75% of those who bought online could have bought their phone in a store if they had wanted. 61% who bought their phone in a store could have bought online, though 30% said they could not have done that, according to Pew Internet Project. With the sizable influence online information exerts on 39% of cell phone purchasers, it is understandable that this group is more likely to buy their phones online. Some 26% of this group bought a cell phone online, although 70% still go down to the store.

68% of cell phone buyers consult the owner’s manual

68% of people take to the owner’s manual to figure out the new device, according to Pew Internet Project. Some people will go further, especially if they meet a problem that they can’t address themselves. Here is what cell phone buyers said they did when they encountered problems with their cell phone: 23% visited a cell phone store; 18% called their phone carrier; 9% called the cell phone manufacturer; 7% (of internet users) went online for information or help; 4% discussed the cell phone in an online forum or community.

39% of cell phone buyers research phones on the internet

People take advantage of the internet to explore cell phone options (39% do) and within this group, many report that something they found online influenced the choice they made. At the same time, perhaps because a cell phone has a plethora of technical features, people are drawn to expertise associated with traditional gatekeepers, according to Pew Internet Project. More people consult a salesperson (59%) or go to a cell phone store (46%) than use the internet (39%) when considering a cell phone purchase. Among those using the internet to gather information, 76% go to websites of cell phone manufacturers or phone companies. Among those who need to troubleshoot a phone once they’ve bought it, most use the owner’s manual (68%). Just 11% of online users consult the internet to address the problem and 7% look for experiences of others that might be posted online. Nonetheless, cell phone buyers carefully scrutinize their choice even as they rely on traditional sources of expertise. Some 59% of those who use the internet to get information use websites to compare features of cell phones and half read reviews of cell phones on websites or blogs.

Only 3% recycle their mobile phones

Only 3% of people recycle their mobile phones despite the fact that most have old devices lying around at home that they no longer want, according to Nokia. Yet very few old devices, 4%, are being thrown into landfill. Instead the majority, 44%, are simply being kept at homes never used. Others are giving their mobiles another life in different ways, one quarter are passing on their old phones to friends or family, and 16% of people are selling their used devices particularly in emerging markets. Globally, 74% of consumers said they don’t think about recycling their phones, despite the fact that around the same number, 72%, think recycling makes a difference to the environment. This was consistent across many different countries with 88% of people in Indonesia not considering recycling unwanted devices, 84% in India, and 78% of people in Brazil, Sweden, Germany and Finland.

Only 3% recycle their mobile phones

Only 3% of people recycle their mobile phones despite the fact that most have old devices lying around at home that they no longer want, according to Nokia. Yet very few old devices, 4%, are being thrown into landfill. Instead the majority, 44%, are simply being kept at homes never used. Others are giving their mobiles another life in different ways, one quarter are passing on their old phones to friends or family, and 16% of people are selling their used devices particularly in emerging markets. Globally, 74% of consumers said they don’t think about recycling their phones, despite the fact that around the same number, 72%, think recycling makes a difference to the environment. This was consistent across many different countries with 88% of people in Indonesia not considering recycling unwanted devices, 84% in India, and 78% of people in Brazil, Sweden, Germany and Finland.

39% of adults said they had bought a cell phone in the previous year

Cell phones have become a staple for many Americans, with 78% of adults now having one, up from 21% in 1996, according to Pew Internet Project. With many cell phone allowing users to have free or low-cost upgrades of phones every 24 months, decisions on new cell phone purchases periodically face users. 39% of adults said that they had bought a cell phone in the previous year. Some 26% of adults were directed to the cell phone module of questions in the survey that asked about the decision-making process in buying a new cell phone. A range of reasons were cited as to why people bought a new phone: 27% said their old cell phone failed or broke; 14% simply wanted a new phone; 13% wanted a better phone, or one with more features; 13% said they were offered a good deal, got a free or low-cost upgrade, or got a new service plan.

59% of cell-phone buyers ask an expert for advice

The information-gathering process involved with buying a cell phone has a number of steps and stops: 59% ask an expert or a salesperson for advice; 46% go to one or more cell phone stores; 39% use the internet; 37% ask friends, family, or co-workers; 19% consult newspapers, magazines, or books; 19% use the television and radio; 10% use a source not mentioned. 93% of cell phone shoppers sought out one of the people or sources listed above, 66% consulted at least two, and 41% at least three, according to Pew Internet Project. The 39% of those who consulted the internet before buying a cell phone took advantage of several different kinds of online resources

78% of cell buyers say they felt they had the right amount of information in considering their purchase

78% of cell buyers say they felt they had the right amount of information in considering their purchase and 87% are either somewhat or very satisfied with the cell phone they bought, according to Pew Internet Project. Notably, there is not a lot of chatter online for cell phone users once they buy their device. Just 4% say they post a review about their phone and 7% look online for others’ experience with the phone.

3G iPhone is expected to take 7.38% of the converged device market in Australia

3G iPhone is expected to take 7.38% of the converged device market by the end of 2012 in Australia, according to IDC. Nokia maintains market dominance at 51.9%. Nokia’s 6110 Navigator continues to outsell 99.4% of all mobile devices on the market, despite being available in Australia for almost a year. Strong demand is expected to continue until the introduction of its successor, the Nokia 6210 Navigator, later this year. Other vendors such as HTC, Samsung and Sony Ericsson are also focusing more on GPS-enabled devices.

In Q1 2008 2.02 mln mobile devices were sold in Australia

In Q1 2008 2.02 mln mobile devices were shipped to Australia, with 0.57 mln of these being converged devices. IDC expects that by 2012 converged devices will account for almost 50% of all mobile devices shipped in Australia. Australia’s mobile replacement rate is expected to exceed 42.9% in 2008, up from 40.7% in 2007.

Mobile subscriber monthly consumption of content and applications in March 2008

US EU FR DE IT ES UK
Total mobile subscribers 226 m 224 m 46.5 m 49 m 47 m 34 m 47 m
Watched video 6.0% 9.2% 7.3% 6.2% 11.2% 12.8% 9.4%
Listened to music 7.4% 17.9% 16.1% 17.6% 14.7% 22.5% 19.9%
Accessed news/info via browser 13.7% 9.5% 10.1% 5.7% 7.8% 7.2% 16.3%
Received SMS ads 19.2% 49.6% 63.5% 29.7% 53.9% 73.0% 35.4%
Played downloaded game 9.0% 8.3% 4.4% 7.3% 9.0% 11.4% 10.3%
Accessed downloaded application 4.9% 2.9% 1.8% 2.6% 4.1% 2.5% 3.4%
Sent/received photos or videos 23.0% 27.6% 25.0% 20.9% 32.0% 31.0% 30.2%
Purchased ringtones 9.2% 3.8% 4.1% 3.6% 4.0% 4.1% 3.2%
Used email 12.6% 8.6% 6.5% 7.2% 11.2% 9.1% 9.1%
Accessed social networking sites 4.8% 2.8% 2.4% 1.3% 2.7% 2.5% 4.9%
Source: mMetrics

24% of European households don’t have landlines

24% of European households have given up fixed landlines for mobile phones, up from 22% in 2006. The Czech Republic, Finland and Lithuania had the lowest number of landlines in use. 22% are now using their PCs for phone calls or video chatting via programs such as Skype. That is a rise of 5% from 2006. In Lithuania, 61% of the households were using Internet phone services.