5% of internet users who found a place to live discussed their new place or neighborhood in an online forum or community

Among internet users who found a place to live: 5% discussed their new place or neighborhood in an online forum or community; 4% posted comments or ratings online about real estate agents and others they dealt with in finding a place to live; 4% posted comments about their new place or neighborhood on a website or blog; 3% joined a neighborhood listserv. This comes to just 13% of internet users who moved in the prior year doing at least one of these activities, according to the Pew Internet Project.

Only 0.4% of grocery coupons get used

US consumers redeemed less than 1% of the estimated 285 bln coupons issued 2007 for groceries and various packaged goods. Advertisers paid newspapers to distribute nearly 90% of the coupons issued 2007 for packaged goods, according to NCH Marketing Services. Just 0.4% of the packaged goods coupons were printed out on the Internet 2007, NCH estimated.

58% of Americans say that online information gave them a good introduction to their new community

Those who use the internet in their housing search see payoffs mainly in lower search costs and in getting a feel for the places they may live, according to the Pew Internet Project. Fully 58% say that information found online gave them a good introduction to their new community, and 57% said it reduced the number of houses or apartments they looked at. Overall, 76% of respondents say that online information helped them in one of these two key ways in structuring their real estate search. Additionally, 27% say that online information actually changed the neighborhood in which they were planning to live.

4% of Americans discussed cell phones in an online forum or community

4% discussed the cell phone in an online forum or community. In terms of sharing general opinions about a new cell phone, 60% people say they have talked about a new device with friends, family, or co-workers, according to the Pew Internet Project. The internet, however, does not play a large role in after-purchase chatter or inquiry: 11% of internet users in the cell phone module looked online for information on how to use the phone; 7% looked online for others’ experiences with the same phone; 4% posted a rating or review of the cell phone on a website or blog. 13% of internet users who got a new cell phone in 2007 did at least one of the three after-purchase online chatter activities. When including post-purchase online activity relating to troubleshooting (i.e., going online for help or consulting an online forum), some 19% of internet users who bought a phone in the prior year turned to the internet after their purchase regarding something relating to it.

29% of Americans said online information helped them get a better price on their house or apartment

Online information also helps in the pocketbook for some people. Among those who used the internet to do research on a place to live, 29% said they believe online information helped them get a better price on their house or apartment, according to the Pew Internet Project. Some 35% of buyers thought online resources helped them get a better price, while 28% of renters said this. In general, when asked to assess the impact online information had on their housing decision: 23% of those who used the internet in their research said it had a major impact; 36% said it had a minor impact; 42% said it had no impact at all. Only 15% said that their online searches produced poor or misleading information. For all those who found a new place to live in the prior year, 79% feel they got the right amount of information in the process. 14% say they had too little information and 5% too much.

24% of US teens write music

All teens Cell phone
owners
Computer
owners
Types of non-school writing
Write letters or notes
to other people
64% 67% 64%
Write in a journal 34 36 36
Short writing 32 32 32
Do creative writing 25 25 25
Write music or lyrics 24 21 22
Create audio, video or
PowerPoint
presentations
16 15 18
Write essays 8 7 7
Write computer
programs
6 6 5
Frequency of non-school writing
Several times a week
or more
36% 35% 39%
Several times a month
or less often
54 56 50
Never 9 8 10
Source: Pew Internet Project

47% of black teens have written in a personal journal in the past year

Black teens are more likely than whites to write in a journal and to write music or lyrics in their personal time. 47% of black teens have written in a personal journal in the past year, and 37% have written music or lyrics. This compares with 31% and 23%, respectively, for white teens, according to Pew Internet Project. Boys and girls have similar habits with respect to the writing they do for personal enjoyment with two major exceptions: girls are significantly more likely than boys to write letters or notes to other people (77% of girls have done so in the past year, compared with 52% for boys) and to write in a journal (49% of girls keep a journal, compared with 20% of boys). Older girls are particularly avid letter writers and journalkeepers. Fully 81% of older girls write notes or letters and nearly six in ten (57%) keep a journal.

21% of 15-17 year olds usually use computers for their school writing

19% of white teens typically do their school writing on a computer, compared with one in ten blacks (11%) and English-speaking Hispanics (9%), according to Pew Internet Project. Older teens also tend to rely more heavily on computers when writing for school. 21% of 15-17 year olds usually use computers for their school writing, compared with 12% of younger teens. 24% of teens whose parents have a college degree say they usually use a computer for school writing, compared with 10% teens with parents who have some college education, 15% of teens whose parents are high school graduates, and 10% of teens whose parents have less than a high school education.

65% of teens usually do their school writing by hand

Despite widespread technology ownership and usage among teens, 65% of teens say they usually do their school writing by hand, compared with 16% who usually use a computer. The remaining teens say that their choice of writing instrument depends on the assignment (4% of teens say this), or that they rely equally on longhand and computer writing (14%), according to Pew Internet Project. Among teens who primarily write by hand, 86% write using a computer at least occasionally. Taken together, this means that just 9% of all teens write only by hand and never use a computer.

7% of US teens do not do any writing in their English classes

82% teens say that the writing assignments they do for school typically range from a paragraph to around one page in length, according to Pew Internet Project. 12% say that most of their writing involves longer pieces of 2-5 pages. 3% of teens say that most of their school writing involves major writing assignments of 5 pages or more in length. This trend is even more sharply delineated outside of English courses. In classes other than English, 78% of students say they usually write shorter pieces of a page or less, and 7% say they do no writing at all in these courses.

56% of teens said they think writing is essential

56% of teens said they think writing is essential, and another 30% say it is important but not essential for later success. Just 12% of teens said writing was only somewhat important, and 2% said it wasn’t important at all, according to Pew Internet Project. The more teens enjoy the writing they do (whether in or out of school), the more likely they are to consider writing an essential skill for their future success in life. Among teens who enjoy their non-school writing “a great deal,” 67% consider writing to be essential for success in life. Among teens who get less enjoyment from their non-school writing, 51% consider writing to be an essential skill.

50% of teens are writing something just about every day

50% of all teens say that their school work involves writing something just about every day, and 35% do school writing several times a week, according to Pew Internet Project. The remaining 15% write for school several times a month (7%) or less frequently (8%). The frequency with which teens write for school exhibits little variation across demographic or socio-economic boundaries. Interestingly, 61% of black teens say their school work requires them to write something just about every day, significantly higher than the rate for whites (47%). However, the percentage of teens who write for school several times a week or more is practically identical for whites (83%), blacks (87%) and Hispanics (87%).

40% of parents think computers have a negative impact on their child’s writing

More Likely Less Likely Makes no
Difference
Strongly resonant
Write better because
they can revise and
edit easily
69% 11% 17%
Present ideas clearly 54 7 34
Be creative 50 10 36
Moderately resonant
Take short cuts and
not put effort into
writing
45% 14% 35%
Communicate well 43 18 36
Use poor spelling and
grammar
40 28 30
Write too fast and be
careless
40 13 41
Weakly resonant
Have a short attention
span
22% 18% 53%
Source: Pew Internet Project

75% of higher-income teens like to write up science labs

Teens from families earning $50,000 or more per year are more likely than lower-income teens to write up science labs (75% of higher-income teens do this, compared with 67% of lower-income teens) and to create audio, video or PowerPoint presentations (72% vs. 61% for lower-income teens), according to Pew Internet Project. Finally, some gender differences exist with respect to the types of writing teens do at school, although these differences are generally quite minimal. Specifically, girls are slightly more likely than boys to write essays at school (96% of girls do this, compared with 91% of boys), while boys are slightly more likely to write computer programs (13% of boys and 7% of girls have done so in the past year).

48% of parents feel that their children write more than they themselves did at the same age

48% of parents feel that their children write more than they themselves did at the same age, 31% believe that children today write less. An additional 20% feel that their children write about as much teens in the past. Parents with lower levels of education are likely to feel that their child writes more than they did at a similar age. Among parents with a high school degree or less, 57% feel that their child writes more than they did-just 41% of college-educated parents feel the same, according to Pew Internet Project.

83% of parents think writing skills are more important today

83% of parents feel that there is a greater need to write well today than there was 20 years ago, compared with 9% who feel that good writing skills are no more or less important than ever, according to Pew Internet Project. Just 5% feel that the ability to write well is less important now than in the past. Recognition of the importance of good writing is particularly high in black households-94% of black parents say that good writing skills are more important now than in the past, compared with 82% of white parents and 79% of English-speaking Hispanic parents. Parents with lower levels of education are also more likely to believe that good writing skills are particularly important to success in today’s economy. Fully 88% of parents with a high school degree or less say that writing is more important in today’s world, compared with 80% of parents with at least some college experience.

63% of black teens use social networking profiles for communication

Among social networking teens, whites are more likely than blacks to use their social networking profile as a communication tool, whether to post messages to a friend’s wall (78% of whites do this, versus 63% of blacks) or to send private messages within the social networking system (75% v. 55%), according to Pew Internet Project. Indeed, fifteen percent of black social networking teens do not do any of the six activities listed above, compared with just 4% of white teens. The sample size of social networking Hispanic teens (n=62) is too small to make meaningful inferences about the communication choices of this group. Fully 63% of teens from households earning under $50,000 per year do this, compared with half (49%) of teens from higher-income households (somewhat lower rates of cell phone ownership among lower-income teens may help explain this phenomenon).

87% of all teens engage in electronic communication

87% of all teens engage at least occasionally in some form of electronic personal communication, which includes text messaging, sending email or instant messages, or posting comments on social networking sites, according to Pew Internet Project. Although participation in these activities is widespread, 60% of teens who send these communications do not consider them to be “writing.” 38% of teens think of these communications as writing, and an additional 2% don’t know whether they consider them to be writing or not.

96% of 15-17-year-old teens like to create essays

15 to 17-age teens are somewhat more likely to create essays and create more presentations for school of writing than younger teens ages 12 to 14 (96% of older teens do this, compared with 90% of younger teens), according to Pew Internet Project. Older teens are also much more likely to create presentations for school (76% of older teens have created presentations for their course work, versus 61% of younger teens). Beyond these two activities, younger and older teens do similar types of school writing.

24% of white teens say they usually do their non-school writing on a computer

24% of white teens say they usually do their nonschool writing on a computer, compared with 5% of black teens and 11% of Hispanics. Similarly, 21% of teens ages 15-17 usually use computers for their non-school writing, compared with 15% of teens ages 12-14, according to Pew Internet Project. While girls and boys are equally likely to use computers for their school writing, boys show a greater tendency to rely on computers when writing for personal enjoyment outside of school. 23% of boys primarily use a computer for the writing they do for personal enjoyment, compared with 14% for girls. This difference may be due in part to the types of writing boys and girls engage in. As noted above, girls are more likely than boys to engage in traditionally longhand activities such as writing letters or notes and maintaining a personal journal. 31% teens from households where their parents have a college or advanced degree usually use a computer for their non-school writing, compared with 14% of teens with parents who have some college education and 13% of teens whose parents have no college experience.